Professionalism, Ethics and Civility

ABOTA’s Code of Professionalism  and Principles of Civility, Integrity and Professionalism provide a guide of proper conduct for lawyers. ABOTA developed a program called Civility Matters, an effort to promote the first specific purpose in ABOTA’s constitution: “To elevate the standards of integrity, honor and courtesy in the legal profession.” ABOTA created “Civility Matters” with the hope that the program would be presented at all ABOTA educational activities, other bar and professional programs, and, especially, in every law school in the country.

The Civility Matters publication — Why Civility and Why Now? — and accompanying DVDs are available through ABOTA provide all the resources needed to host a Civility Matters session, as well as some guidelines for doing so.

ABOTA Chapters host and promote successful Civility Matters programs. The programs feature first-hand lessons learned and experiences of ABOTA members who’ve successfully implemented these programs in the past and offered their wisdom during its development. Much appreciation goes to these members.

Click here to watch a Civility Matters presentation.

If you are planning an event, please let ABOTA know by calling (800) 779-5879 or emailing us at CivilityMatters@abota.org. We’d be happy to address any questions or concerns you might have and to help you make your event a success.

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The following states have incorporated civility language in their attorney oaths:

 

  • Utah: “I will discharge the duties of attorney and counselor at law as an officer of the courts of this State with honesty, fidelity, professionalism, and civility; and that I will faithfully observe the Rules of Professional Conduct and the Standards of Professionalism and Civility”
    Oath Modified August 14, 2007
    Cite: www.utcourts.gov/resources/rules/ucja/ch13/intro.htm

 

 

  • Florida: “To opposing parties and their counsel, I pledge fairness, integrity, and civility, not only in court, but also in all written and oral communications.”
    Oath modified September 12, 2011
    Cite: Florida Bar