The American Board of Trial Advocates Supports Chief Justice Roberts' Defense of an Independent Judiciary

DALLAS (November 23, 2018)—The rule of law and the independence of the judiciary are  fundamental, guiding principles of our historic, constitutional system of the separation of  powers, created through the genius of our founding fathers, and so admired throughout the  world. Our founders purposely designed the judicial branch to be apolitical. Judges are governed  by the rule of law—not partisanship or shifting political winds.  

Partisan assaults based on supposed political affiliation because of which administration  nominated a judge perpetuates a troubling misperception of the role of our courts and their  constitutional judicial independence.  Attacks on specific judges or specific appellate  courts and threats to break up the courts are inappropriate and undermine the institutional  credibility of our judicial system.  As stated by Justice Neil M. Gorsuch during his confirmation  hearings last year, these kinds of attacks are “demoralizing and disheartening.” 

We applaud United States Supreme Court Chief Justice Roberts for stating that: 

"We do not have Obama judges or Trump judges, Bush judges or Clinton judges.  What  we have is an extraordinary group of dedicated judges doing their level best to do equal  right to those appearing before them.  That independent judiciary is something we  should all be thankful for.” 

The American Board of Trial Advocates fully supports Chief Justice John Roberts’ statement and  we give thanks for an independent judiciary. 

Cynthia McGuinn 
National President, American Board of Trial Advocates 


About the American Board of Trial Advocates 

Founded in 1958, ABOTA is an invitation‐only national association of experienced trial lawyers  and judges. ABOTA and its members are dedicated to the preservation and promotion of the  civil jury trial right provided by the Seventh Amendment to the U.S. Constitution. ABOTA  membership consists of more than 7,600 lawyers—equally balanced between plaintiff and  defense — and judges in all 50 states and the District of Columbia.